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Channel 4 celebrates success at BAFTA TV Awards

The winners of the House of Fraser British Academy Television Awards were revealed last night at a ceremony hosted by Graham Norton at the Theatre Royal, Drury Lane, London.

The winners of the House of Fraser British Academy Television Awards were revealed last night at a ceremony hosted by Graham Norton (pictured) at the Theatre Royal, Drury Lane, London.

The Lost Honour of Christopher Jefferies scooped two awards, with Jason Watkins receiving his career-first BAFTA in the Leading Actor category. The Peter Morgan-scripted drama, which tells the true story of the title character’s false accusation of murder and the media vilification that followed, also received the award for Mini-Series.

In the Supporting Actress category Gemma Jones received her first ever BAFTA for Marvellous, the feature-length biopic of Neil Baldwin. Marvellous was also successful against strong competition in the Single Drama category.

Georgina Campbell won the BAFTA for Leading Actress in BBC Three drama, Murdered by My Boyfriend, and Stephen Rea won the Supporting Actor award for his role in political thriller The Honourable Woman.

For the second year running there were two BAFTAs for Ant and Dec’s Saturday Night Takeaway: a win in the ever-competitive Entertainment Programme category and in Entertainment Performance for Ant and Dec themselves.

Channel 4 fared well in factual programming: Grayson Perry: Who Are You? won for Specialist Factual, The Island with Bear Grylls was successful in its first series for Reality & Constructed Factual, and long-running architecture series, Grand Designs, received its first-ever BAFTA, for Features. The BAFTA for Single Documentary was awarded to the compelling vigilante documentary, The Paedophile Hunter, while the award for Current Affairs went to Children on the Frontline (Dispatches).

BBC Three’s Life and Death Row, which gained unprecedented access to US death row inmates in an intimate both-sides study of violence and justice, received the BAFTA for Factual Series. The award for News Coverage went to Sky News Live at Five: Ebola, while BBC Two’s WW1 Remembered – From the Battlefield & Westminster Abbey received the BAFTA for Sport & Live Event.

Included in the ceremony was a short filmed tribute to author, critic and broadcaster Clive James, featuring clips from his career, as well as footage of the presentation of his Special Award earlier this year. The tribute was led by Charlie Brooker in recognition of James’ outstanding creative contribution to television.

The Special Award in honour of Alan Clarke was presented to Jeff Pope, one of the UK’s foremost producers and writers whose career has spanned television and film, resulting in nine BAFTA nominations.

The Fellowship, the highest accolade the Academy bestows, was presented to journalist, news correspondent and presenter Jon Snow in recognition of an outstanding career spanning over 40 years in the industry. During that time, Snow has reported to British audiences on many of the defining moments of the 20th and 21st centuries, including the release of Nelson Mandela, the fall of the Berlin Wall and the inauguration of Barack Obama as President of the United States.

The Radio Times Audience Award, the only award voted for by the public, was won by Sherlock.

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