HD PoV wireless cameras - TVBEurope

HD PoV wireless cameras

GoPro has a rival in the form of GoBandit, a Munich-based company, which is to launch an HD point of view camera with WiFi connectivity in March, just weeks after GoPro's own new WiFi kit.
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GoPro has a rival in the form of GoBandit, a Munich-based company, which is to launch an HD point of view camera with WiFi connectivity in March, just weeks after GoPro's own new WiFi kit, writes Adrian Pennington.

Targeted at action sports, GoBandit Live differs from Go Pro’s Hero HD by including a number of onboard sensors such as speed, altitude and position as well as heartbeat and g-force.

It shoots 1080 or 720p or at 480 for slo-motion playback at 60fps and records to a 32GB micro-card. Images can also be streamed to the internet by way of a free iPhone app, which can also double as a remote viewfinder.

Other specs include a 170º wide-angle lens and 3-axis gyro sensor which records the camera's position in space.

A second app, GoBandit Studio allows users to individualize their videos by adding skins and performance data.

The GoBandit Live will cost $429 and will be released alongside a version of the camera without wireless connectivity, called Race, costing $329.

Both GoBandit models weigh 145g and measure 105 x 62 x 34mm.

Multiple GoPro control

Up to 50 GoPro HD Hero2 cameras can be remotely controlled and their images streamed live remotely via a new mini wireless unit.

The ultra lightweight WiFi BacPac attaches to the back of the miniature HD cameras. Control is by either a GoPro WiFi Remote, which can be worn on the wrist, or a free app for Android or Apple smartphones.

If controlled via an iPad, up to 50 of the live streams can be viewed and selected for use. One video stream can be recorded direct to the Hero2’s SD card while sending another stream via WiFi to the web or a smart device. The original HD Hero can be controlled by the remote, but can't do any streaming.

The Wi-Fi BacPac and Wi-Fi Remote Combo Kit will cost $99 and should be available in April.

In addition, Tim Macmillan, founder of pioneering UK camera image array company Time-Slice Films, which originated the frozen time effect, has joined GoPro in a development role.

According to GoPro’s Rick Loughery: “You will see Tim work with us to devise multiple camera array applications.”

The first of these is a planned 60-camera array of GoPro cameras for ESPN’s coverage of the upcoming X-Games, which will be broadcast from Aspen next weekend.

www.gobandit.com
www.gopro.com
www.timeslicefilms.com

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