News Business
News

Global broadcast manufacturing continues growth

9 February 2011
Global broadcast manufacturing continues growth

Reports from the IABM indicate that the global broadcast manufacturing industry is in long term recovery, writes Adrian Pennington, with forecasts suggesting that, by 2012, the market will be back to the levels of pre-recessionary 2008.

Ahead of launching the first set of data from its Global Market Valuation & Strategy Report 2011 – 2015, at NAB, the trade body says the decline, following “a pretty damaging recession,” bottomed out in the spring of 2010 and steady growth has been evident ever since.

“Our market intelligence indicates quite clearly that the industry is now in growth,” said IABM Director General, Peter White. “This recovery has been regional though with the APAC region experiencing a very shallow depression and a quick recovery and EMEA suffering a deeper trough but experiencing stronger growth since.

"North America however suffered from the deepest of recessions in our industry, probably due to its heavy reliance on declining advertising revenues in their predominant free to air environment. Going forward however, the level of confidence from our North American respondents is higher than anywhere else as they now seem to be experiencing the recovery felt in Europe six months ago.”

In addition the latest IABM Broadcasters’ Survey indicates a new approach to procurement and engagement with suppliers. There is much more focus on products that are fit for purpose rather than best of breed, products that are easily integrated into existing system architecture and are tried and tested rather than leading edge.

“Broadcast customers are now more risk averse than before and are looking for solutions rather than ‘bells and whistles’ products,” says White. “A broadcaster will look for a wider range of services from one supplier and the preferred supplier approach is becoming predominant. System integrators are therefore gaining greater traction in the market and for some smaller suppliers they are losing direct contact with their traditional customers.”

There also continues to be a dearth of skills and talent available in the industry, says the IABM. Many suppliers and broadcasters have cut back on their general training for broadcast engineering in the sector and this is now having a knock on effect in terms of creating constraints to growth going forward.

“This shortage of skilled engineering talent has been apparent for some time and our members have cited it consistently as a constraint to growth in our trends surveys over the last two years. The IABM are now tackling this issue with its new Training Academy initiative,” White explained.

www.theiabm.org
Reports from the IABM indicate that the global broadcast manufacturing industry is in long term recovery, writes Adrian Pennington, with forecasts suggesting that, by 2012, the market will be back to the levels of pre-recessionary 2008.

Ahead of launching the first set of data from its Global Market Valuation & Strategy Report 2011 – 2015, at NAB, the trade body says the decline, following “a pretty damaging recession,” bottomed out in the spring of 2010 and steady growth has been evident ever since.

“Our market intelligence indicates quite clearly that the industry is now in growth,” said IABM Director General, Peter White. “This recovery has been regional though with the APAC region experiencing a very shallow depression and a quick recovery and EMEA suffering a deeper trough but experiencing stronger growth since.

"North America however suffered from the deepest of recessions in our industry, probably due to its heavy reliance on declining advertising revenues in their predominant free to air environment. Going forward however, the level of confidence from our North American respondents is higher than anywhere else as they now seem to be experiencing the recovery felt in Europe six months ago.”

In addition the latest IABM Broadcasters’ Survey indicates a new approach to procurement and engagement with suppliers. There is much more focus on products that are fit for purpose rather than best of breed, products that are easily integrated into existing system architecture and are tried and tested rather than leading edge.

“Broadcast customers are now more risk averse than before and are looking for solutions rather than ‘bells and whistles’ products,” says White. “A broadcaster will look for a wider range of services from one supplier and the preferred supplier approach is becoming predominant. System integrators are therefore gaining greater traction in the market and for some smaller suppliers they are losing direct contact with their traditional customers.”

There also continues to be a dearth of skills and talent available in the industry, says the IABM. Many suppliers and broadcasters have cut back on their general training for broadcast engineering in the sector and this is now having a knock on effect in terms of creating constraints to growth going forward.

“This shortage of skilled engineering talent has been apparent for some time and our members have cited it consistently as a constraint to growth in our trends surveys over the last two years. The IABM are now tackling this issue with its new Training Academy initiative,” White explained.

www.theiabm.org

Similar stories
RELATED WHITEPAPERS