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3Ality’s Steve Schklair examines 3DTV business case

17 June 2011
3Ality’s Steve Schklair examines 3DTV business case

By Carolyn Giardina

Testing for production of 3D episodic series is underway in the US and UK—though in one case the plan is to shoot in 3D and broadcast in 2D, according to 3Ality Digital CEO Steve Schklair.

On 15 June during TVBEurope’s 3D Masters conference, Schklair explained that business strategies vary, and in this instance, the producers want to create a 3D version of the show–which he declined to identify—for release on 3D Blu-ray at the conclusion of the season. He pointed out that viewers with DVRs already have the 2D version of the show, but the 3D gives them something new and unique. “The (production) cost differential is easily made up by Blu-ray sales,” Schklair said of the business case.

He added with an eye toward future proofing their content, the producers also want the 3D version for archival purposes.

During the conversation, which was moderated by TVBEurope Editorial Consultant Adrian Pennington, Schklair suggested that making 3D ubiquitous “is more a business case question than a technology question. It has to move from marketing departments to being self sustaining.”

To do that, he said the industry must control production costs and schedules. “You can shoot 3D as fast as 2D if you have the right technologies on set,” Schklair said. “If the schedule is dealt with, the other side of the coin is budget.”
Schklair said that key budget items are extra equipment, which might be double or triple the cost of 2D gear; and extra crew, which 3Ality is addressing with its latest gear.

Sky 3D is testing 3Ality’s IntelleCal, designed to automatically align two cameras on a stereo rig; and IntelleCam, designed to automatically control the convergence and the interaxial spacing of the cameras.

Schklair explained that when shooting a live event in 3D, each camera typically requires a convergence operator. And he reported that estimates suggested that the cost could be $10,000 per person (including expenses such as that person’s airfare and accommodation for a live event).

Elimination of some of those roles might potentially save nearly $100,000 in some cases, Schklair estimated.
“That’s a big number,” he said. “That helps make that into a business.”

www.3alitydigital.com
By Carolyn Giardina

Testing for production of 3D episodic series is underway in the US and UK—though in one case the plan is to shoot in 3D and broadcast in 2D, according to 3Ality Digital CEO Steve Schklair.

On 15 June during TVBEurope’s 3D Masters conference, Schklair explained that business strategies vary, and in this instance, the producers want to create a 3D version of the show–which he declined to identify—for release on 3D Blu-ray at the conclusion of the season. He pointed out that viewers with DVRs already have the 2D version of the show, but the 3D gives them something new and unique. “The (production) cost differential is easily made up by Blu-ray sales,” Schklair said of the business case.

He added with an eye toward future proofing their content, the producers also want the 3D version for archival purposes.

During the conversation, which was moderated by TVBEurope Editorial Consultant Adrian Pennington, Schklair suggested that making 3D ubiquitous “is more a business case question than a technology question. It has to move from marketing departments to being self sustaining.”

To do that, he said the industry must control production costs and schedules. “You can shoot 3D as fast as 2D if you have the right technologies on set,” Schklair said. “If the schedule is dealt with, the other side of the coin is budget.”

Schklair said that key budget items are extra equipment, which might be double or triple the cost of 2D gear; and extra crew, which 3Ality is addressing with its latest gear.

Sky 3D is testing 3Ality’s IntelleCal, designed to automatically align two cameras on a stereo rig; and IntelleCam, designed to automatically control the convergence and the interaxial spacing of the cameras.

Schklair explained that when shooting a live event in 3D, each camera typically requires a convergence operator. And he reported that estimates suggested that the cost could be $10,000 per person (including expenses such as that person’s airfare and accommodation for a live event).

Elimination of some of those roles might potentially save nearly $100,000 in some cases, Schklair estimated.

“That’s a big number,” he said. “That helps make that into a business.”

www.3alitydigital.com

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